SRF Technology - Cryomodule
module testing and infrastructure
Paper Title Page
WETEA1
ESS Technology Development at IPNO and CEA Paris-Saclay  
 
  • G. Devanz
    CEA-IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
 
  The French In-kind contribution to the superconducting linac of the European Spallation Source ESS consists in the development from design to delivery of the thirteen spoke cryomodules by CNRS IPN Orsay and of the nine medium beta and twenty-one high beta elliptical cavity cryomodules by CEA Paris-Saclay. Recently, prototype cryomodules serving the purpose of demontrating the chosen technology, one for spokes, one for medium beta ellipticals have been built and tested, with additional contributions of Uppsala University and INFN Lasa. The component design and performance in the recent cryomodule tests at 2 K are presented, as well as the individual testing activities of pre-series and series components.  
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WETEA2
SRF Cryomodules for PIP-2 at Fermilab  
 
  • G. Wu
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: The work is supported by Fermilab which is operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.
The Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II) is an essential upgrade to the Fermilab accelerator complex to provide powerful, high-intensity proton beams to the laboratory’s experiments. Design challenges include the areas of high Q cavities, high power couplers, resonance control, and oversea transportation. The recent developments of cavities and cryomodules for the PIP-2 project will be described.
 
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WETEA4
Production and Performance of LCLS-II Cryomodules  
 
  • A. Burrill
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  This talk will present the current status of the testing and installation of the LCLS-II 1.3 GHz cryomodules. The overall performance obtained in testing, quality factor and gradient, as well as the impact of field emission, multipacting and microphonics will be discussed. In addition the current status of the cryomodule transport from the partner labs to SLAC as well as the installation at SLAC will be presented.  
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WETEA6
Successful Beam Commissioning in STF-2 Cryomodules for ILC  
 
  • Y. Yamamoto, M. Akemoto, D.A. Arakawa, S. Araki, A. Aryshev, M. Egi, M.K. Fukuda, K. Hara, H. Hayano, Y. Honda, T. Honma, E. Kako, H. Katagiri, M. Kawamura, N. Kimura, Y. Kojima, Y. Kondou, T. Konomi, T. Matsumoto, S. Michizono, T. Miura, T. Miyajima, Y. Morikawa, H. Nakai, H. Nakajima, N. Nakamura, K. Nakanishi, T. Obina, T. Oyama, F. Qiu, T. Saeki, H. Sakai, T. Sanami, M. Shimada, H. Shimizu, T. Shishido, S.I. Takahara, K. Umemori, A. Yamamoto
    KEK, Ibaraki, Japan
  • M. Kuriki, S. Notsu
    Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Science, Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan
  • S. Matsuba
    JASRI, Hyogo, Japan
  • K. Sakaue
    The University of Tokyo, The School of Engineering, Tokyo, Japan
 
  Beam commissioning of the STF-2 accelerator was successfully done at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) in KEK from February to March 2019. As a result of various cavity tuning, LLRF control tuning, and beam tuning, the beam energy finally reached 271 MeV, and the accelerating gradient of each cavity estimated from beam energy was 32.0 MV/m. This result satisfies 31.5 MV/m, which is the operating specification of the International Linear Collider (ILC) project, and is an important milestone in the ILC technology demonstration. In this talk, we will report on the detailed results of beam commissioning.  
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THP049 Commissioning the JLab LERF Cryomodule Test Facility 973
 
  • C. Hovater, R. Bachimanchi, E. Daly, M.A. Drury, L.E. Farrish, J. Gubeli, N.A. Huque, K. Jordan, M.E. Joyce, L.K. King, M. Marchlik, W. Moore, T.E. Plawski, A.D. Solopova, C.M. Wilson
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
  • A.L. Benwell, C. Bianchini, D. Gonnella, S.L. Hoobler, K.J. Mattison, J. Nelson, A. Ratti, B.H. Ripman, S. Saraf, L.M. Zacarias
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
  • L.R. Doolittle, S. Paiagua, C. Serrano
    LBNL, Berkeley, California, USA
 
  The JLab Low Energy Recirculating Facility, LERF, has been modified to support concurrent testing of two LCLS-II cryomodules. The cryomodules are installed in a similar fashion as they would be in the L1 section of the LCLS-II linac, including the floor slope and using all of the LCLS-II hardware and controls for cryomodule cryogenics, vacuum, and RF (SSA and LLRF). From the start, it was intended to use LCLS-II electronics and EPICS software controls for cryomodule testing. In affect the LERF test facility becomes the first opportunity to commission and operate the LCLS-II LINAC hardware and software controls. Support for specific cryomodule high level test applications like Q0 and HOMs measurements, are being developed from the basic cryomodule control suite. To support the testing, 2 K He is supplied from the CEBAF south linac cryogenic system, where care must be taken when using the LERF test facility to not upset the CEBAF cryogenics plant. This paper discusses the commissioning of the hardware and software development for testing the first two LCLS-II cryomodules.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP049  
About • paper received ※ 22 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 02 July 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP051 Upgrades to Cryogenic Capabilities for Cryomodule Testing at JLab 983
 
  • N.A. Huque, E. Daly, T. Wijeratne
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
 
  The cryogenic facilities for cryomodule testing at Jefferson Lab (JLab) have been modified and to enable testing of Linear Coherent Light Source-II (LCLS-II) cryomodules. Temporary changes in u-tube connections at the Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) has enabled rates of cavity cooling that are a factor of 10 higher than previously achieved. Cryogenic connections at JLab’s Low Energy Recirculator Facility (LERF) have been repurposed to enable two LCLS-II cryomodules to be tested in series. This testing shares the helium space with the Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) that is also used by the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Cryomodule testing can occur while beam operation is ongoing at CEBAF. Improvements to these facilities have allowed the testing of the JLab’s highest ever performing cryomodules.  
poster icon Poster THP051 [0.722 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP051  
About • paper received ※ 20 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 29 June 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP052 Pansophy Enhancements for SRF Through Collecting and Analyzing Inputs/Outputs to Further Project Efficiency in Reporting and Performance 988
 
  • V.D. Bookwalter, M. Dickey, M.G. McDonald, E.A. McEwen
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
 
  SRF Cavity and Cryomodule testing and production requires a consistent means of collecting and analyzing data against quality and production parameters. JLab’s engineering data management system, Pansophy, is utilized to assist project leaders and subject matter experts (SMEs) with such tasks, by providing a means to data mine key parameter indicators (KPI) and production planning and status data. Recent enhancements to reporting and trending have been utilized for the LCLS-II and CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade projects. Further enhancements are being planned for future projects, like SNS-PPU, such as KPI trending, KPI quality, vendor quality, production timelines and user defined queries. Being able to understand past trends will assist with enhancements to future projects.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP052  
About • paper received ※ 21 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 03 July 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP053 Analysis of the Results of the Tests of IFMIF Accelerating Units 992
 
  • N. Bazin, S. Chel, M. Desmons, G. Devanz, H. Jenhani, O. Piquet
    CEA-DRF-IRFU, France
 
  The prototype IFMIF-EVEDA cryomodule encloses eight superconducting 175 MHz β=0.09 Half-Wave Resonators (HWR). They are designed together with the power coupler to accelerate a high intensity deuteron beam (125 mA) from to 5 to 9 MeV. Two cavity packages, complete with tuning system and power couplers, have been tested in a dedicated horizontal test cryostat - SaTHoRI (Satellite de Tests HOrizontal des Résonateurs IFMIF). The successful operational equivalent tests and tuning of the SRF accelerating units is reported.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP053  
About • paper received ※ 21 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 30 June 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP054 Cryogenic Installations for Module Tests at Mainz 997
 
  • F. Hug, K. Aulenbacher, E. Schilling, D. Simon, T. Stengler, S.D.W. Thomas
    KPH, Mainz, Germany
  • K. Aulenbacher, T. Kürzeder
    HIM, Mainz, Germany
  • A. Skora
    IKP, Mainz, Germany
 
  Funding: This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) under the Cluster of Excellence "PRISMA+" EXC 2118/2019
At Helmholtz Institute Mainz a cryomodule test bunker has been set up for testing dressed modules at 2 K. In a first measurement campaign the high power rf tests of two 1.3 GHz cryomodules for the future MESA accelerator have been performed. We will report on the performance of the test setup, the present and upcom-ing cryogenic installations at the Institute for Nuclear Physics at Mainz, and in particular on the Helium re-frigeration and transport system comprising of a 220 m transport line for liquified gases.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP054  
About • paper received ※ 29 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 30 June 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP055 Magnetic Field Induced by Thermo Electric Current in LCLS-II Cryomodules 1003
 
  • G. Wu, S.K. Chandrasekaran
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: The work is supported by Fermilab which is operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.
Seebeck effect of metals play an important role in cryomodule design. As cryomodule cools down from room temperature down to nominal cavity operating temperature, components in a cryomodule experiences different temperatures. Some components such as power couplers cross from room temperature to 2 K. Thermo electric current forms loops circulating through and around cavities. Such current loops will generate additional magnetic field that could be trapped into cavity wall during superconducting transition as well as during cavity quench. These trapped field can degrade cavity quality factor and increase heat load. Simple circuit model is proposed and compared to calculated trapped field during cryomodule tests.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP055  
About • paper received ※ 26 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 30 June 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP056 Current Results From Acceptance Testing of LCLS-II Cryomodules at Jefferson Lab 1007
 
  • M.A. Drury, E. Daly, N.A. Huque, L.K. King, A.D. Solopova
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
  • J. Nelson, B.H. Ripman, L.M. Zacarias
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  Funding: This work was supported by the LCLS-II Project and the U.S. Department of Energy, Contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.
The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is currently engaged, along with several other Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, in the Linac Co-herent Light Source II project (LCLS-II). The SRF Insti-tute at Jefferson Lab is currently building 21 cryomod-ules for this project. The cryomodules are based on the XFEL design and have been modified for continuous wave (CW) operation and to comply with other LCLS-II specifications. Each cryomodule contains eight 9-cell cavities with coaxial power couplers operating at 1.3 GHz. The cryomodule also contain a magnet package that consists of a quadrupole and two correctors. Most of these cryomodules will be tested in the Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) at Jefferson Lab before shipment to SLAC. Up to three of these cryomodules will be tested in a test stand set up in the Low Energy Recovery Facility (LERF) at Jefferson Lab. Acceptance testing of the LCLS-II cryomodules began in December 2016. Twelve cryomodules have currently completed Acceptance Test-ing. This paper will summarize the results of those tests.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP056  
About • paper received ※ 22 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 30 June 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP058 Conditioning Experience of the ESS Spoke Cryomodule Prototype 1011
 
  • A. Miyazaki, K. Fransson, K.J. Gajewski, L. Hermansson, H. Li, R.J.M.Y. Ruber, R. Santiago Kern, R. Wedberg
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
 
  The prototype cryomodule for the ESS double spoke cavities is tested in the FREIA laboratory at Uppsala University. One of the goals of this test is to establish an efficient way to assess one series cryomodule within a due time (about one month). In 2017, the dedicated high-power test for dressed cavities in the horizontal cryostat (HNOSS) revealed that one of the possible challenges is a conditioning process of the coupler and cavity multipacting. Each process should not damage any components of the cryomodule but at the same time it should be finished in a reasonable time scale. More importantly, unlike the previous tests in the vertical or horizontal cryostat, conditioning two cavities in one cryomodule in due time may require parallel processing in some part of the procedure. This study will be the first practical experience of double spoke cavity conditioning in a cryomodule, and will lead to a standard conditioning recipe for future projects containing superconducting spoke cavities. In this presentation, a preliminary result of cryomodule testing will be shown with a special focus on the conditioning processes.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP058  
About • paper received ※ 01 July 2019       paper accepted ※ 03 July 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP059 RF Incoming Inspection of 1.3 GHz Cryomodules for LCLS-II at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 1014
 
  • S. Aderhold, C. Adolphsen, A. Burrill, D. Gonnella, J. Nelson
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  Funding: This work was supported by the US DOE and the LCLS-II Project.
The main part of the SRF linac for the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will consist of 35 cryomodules with superconducting RF cavities operating at 1.3 GHz. The cryomodules are assembled and tested at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Following the transport to SLAC, the cryomodules undergo several incoming inspection steps before ultimately being moved to the tunnel for installation in the linac. The RF part of the incoming inspection covers measurements of a number of parameters like cavity frequency spectrum, notch filter frequency of the higher order mode couplers and external quality factor Qext of the input coupler. The inspection results are compared to measurements at the partner labs prior to shipping and the nominal values in order to verify that the cryomodules have not been damaged during the transport and are ready for installation. We present an overview and analysis of the inspections for the cryomodules received to date.
 
poster icon Poster THP059 [1.223 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP059  
About • paper received ※ 02 July 2019       paper accepted ※ 02 July 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP060 Experience With LCLS-II Cryomodule Testing at Fermilab 1018
 
  • E.R. Harms, E. Cullerton, C.M. Ginsburg, B.J. Hansen, B.D. Hartsell, J.P. Holzbauer, J. Hurd, V.S. Kashikhin, M.J. Kucera, F.L. Lewis, A. Lunin, D.L. Newhart, D.J. Nicklaus, P.S. Prieto, O.V. Prokofiev, J. Reid, N. Solyak, R.P. Stanek, M.A. Tartaglia, G. Wu
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
  • C. Contreras-Martinez
    FRIB, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
  • J. Einstein-Curtis
    Private Address, Naperville, USA
 
  Funding: This manuscript has been authored by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359 with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics.
The Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS1) at Fermilab has been engaged with testing 8-cavity 1.3 GHz cryomodules designed and assembled for the LCLS-II project at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory since 2016. Over these three years twenty cryomodules have been cooled to 2K and power tested in continuous wave mode on a roughly once per month cycle. Test stand layout and testing procedures are presented together with results from the cryomodules tested to date. Lessons learned and future plans will also be shared.
 
poster icon Poster THP060 [2.774 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP060  
About • paper received ※ 22 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 30 June 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP062 Progress in FRIB Cryomodule Bunker Tests 1029
 
  • W. Chang, S. Caton, A. Ganshyn, W. Hartung, S.H. Kim, B. Laumer, H. Maniar, J.T. Popielarski, K. Saito, M. Xu, T. Xu, C. Zhang, S. Zhao
    FRIB, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science under Cooperative Agreement DE-SC0000661
The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is under construction at Michigan State University (MSU). The FRIB superconducting driver linac will accelerate ion beams to 200 MeV per nucleon. The driver linac requires 104 quarter-wave resonators (QWRs, β = 0.041 and 0.085) and 220 half-wave resonators (HWRs, β = 0.29 and 0.54). The jacketed resonators are Dewar tested at MSU before installation into cryomodules. The cryomodules for β = 0.041, 0.085, and 0.29 have been completed and certified; 32 out of 49 cryomodules are certified via bunker test (as of March 2019). FRIB cryomodule needs 74 solenoid packages: 8-25 cm packages for 0.041 QWR CMs, 36-50 cm for 0.085 CMs, 12-50 cm for 0.29 CMs, and 18-50 cm for 0.53 CMs. The bunker certification completed 58 packages. All the magnets energized at FRIB goal (90 A/8 T for solenoid and 19 A/0.064 Tm for dipoles), all cavities tested at or above specified operating gradient. In this paper, we report the bunker test result.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP062  
About • paper received ※ 23 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 02 July 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP091 Upgrade of the Fermilab Spoke Test Cryostat for Testing of PIP-II 650 MHz 5-Cell Elliptical Cavities 1124
 
  • A.I. Sukhanov, S.K. Chandrasekaran, B.M. Hanna, T.H. Nicol, J.P. Ozelis, Y.M. Pischalnikov, D. Plant, O.V. Prokofiev, O.V. Pronitchev, V. Roger, W. Schappert, I. Terechkine, V.P. Yakovlev
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
  • C. Contreras-Martinez
    FRIB, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
 
  Design of the high beta 650 MHz prototype cryomodule for PIP-II is currently undergoing at Fermilab. The cryomodule includes six 5-cell elliptical SRF cavities with accelerating voltage up to 20 MV and low heat dissipation (Q0 > 3·10zEhNZeHn). Characterization of performance of fully integrated jacketed cavities with high power coupler and tuner is crucial for the project. Such a characterization of jacketed cavity requires a horizontal test cryostat. Existing horizontal testing facilities at Fermilab, Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) and Spoke Test Cryostat (STC), are not large enough to accommodate jacketed 650 MHz 5-cell cavity. An upgrade of the STC is proposed to install extension to the cryostat and modify cryogenic connections and RF infrastructure to provide testing of 650 MHz cavities. In this paper we describe STC upgrade and commissioning of the upgraded facility. We discuss mitigation of issues and problems specific for testing of high Q0 650 MHz cavities, which require low residual magnetic field and low acoustic and mechanical vibrations environment.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP091  
About • paper received ※ 23 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 30 June 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP092 Status of Cryomodule Testing at CMTB for CW R&D 1129
 
  • J. Branlard, V. Ayvazyan, A. Bellandi, J. Eschke, Ç. Gümüş, D. Kostin, K.P. Przygoda, H. Schlarb, J.K. Sekutowicz
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
 
  Cryo Module Test Bench (CMTB) is a facility to perform tests on European XFEL like superconducting accelerating modules. The 120 kW Inductive Output Tube (IOT) installed in the facility allows driving the eight superconducting cavities inside the module under test in a vector-sum or single cavity control fashion with average Continuous Wave (CW) gradients higher than 20 MV/m. The scope of these tests is to evaluate the feasibility of upgrading European XFEL to CW operation mode. Following the successful tests done on a prototype module XM-3 the initial performance results on the production module XM50 will be presented in this paper. Because of European XFEL requirements, XM50 is equipped with modified couplers that allow a variable Loaded Quality factor(QL) to values higher than 4x107. A cost relevant open question is the maximum QL that can be reached while maintaining the system within the European XFEL field stability specifications of 0.01 % in amplitude and 0.01 deg in phase. Because of this, the LLRF system capability of rejecting microphonic and RF disturbances, as well as Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) related effects in open and closed loop is of prime interest.  
poster icon Poster THP092 [1.514 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP092  
About • paper received ※ 25 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 30 June 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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