Author: Huque, N.A.
Paper Title Page
TUP094 Improvements to LCLS-II Cryomodule Transportation 684
 
  • N.A. Huque, E. Daly, P.D. Owen
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
  • B.D. Hartsell, J.P. Holzbauer
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
 
  The Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS-II) is currently being constructed at the SLAC National Laboratory. A total of 35 cryomodules will be fabricated at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in Virginia and Fermi National Laboratory (FNAL) in Illinois and transported via road to SLAC. A shipping frame with an inner bed isolated by springs was designed to protect the CMs from shocks and vibrations during shipments. Successful road testing of the JLab prototype paved the way for production CM shipments. The initial production shipments lead to several catastrophic failures in beamline vacuum in the cryomodules. The failures were determined to be due to fatigue in Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) bellows due to excessive motion during shipment. A series of instrumented CM shipping tests and component tests were undertaken to develop a solution. A modified spring layout was tested and implemented, which reduced shocks on the CMs. FPC coupler bellows restraints were tested on a shaker table and on a CM during shipping; they were able to reduce bellows motion by a factor of three. The updated shipping system is currently in use and has successfully delivered six cryomodules to SLAC from JLab and FNAL.  
poster icon Poster TUP094 [0.958 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-TUP094  
About • paper received ※ 23 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 01 July 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP049 Commissioning the JLab LERF Cryomodule Test Facility 973
 
  • C. Hovater, R. Bachimanchi, E. Daly, M.A. Drury, L.E. Farrish, J. Gubeli, N.A. Huque, K. Jordan, M.E. Joyce, L.K. King, M. Marchlik, W. Moore, T.E. Plawski, A.D. Solopova, C.M. Wilson
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
  • A.L. Benwell, C. Bianchini, D. Gonnella, S.L. Hoobler, K.J. Mattison, J. Nelson, A. Ratti, B.H. Ripman, S. Saraf, L.M. Zacarias
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
  • L.R. Doolittle, S. Paiagua, C. Serrano
    LBNL, Berkeley, California, USA
 
  The JLab Low Energy Recirculating Facility, LERF, has been modified to support concurrent testing of two LCLS-II cryomodules. The cryomodules are installed in a similar fashion as they would be in the L1 section of the LCLS-II linac, including the floor slope and using all of the LCLS-II hardware and controls for cryomodule cryogenics, vacuum, and RF (SSA and LLRF). From the start, it was intended to use LCLS-II electronics and EPICS software controls for cryomodule testing. In affect the LERF test facility becomes the first opportunity to commission and operate the LCLS-II LINAC hardware and software controls. Support for specific cryomodule high level test applications like Q0 and HOMs measurements, are being developed from the basic cryomodule control suite. To support the testing, 2 K He is supplied from the CEBAF south linac cryogenic system, where care must be taken when using the LERF test facility to not upset the CEBAF cryogenics plant. This paper discusses the commissioning of the hardware and software development for testing the first two LCLS-II cryomodules.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP049  
About • paper received ※ 22 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 02 July 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP051 Upgrades to Cryogenic Capabilities for Cryomodule Testing at JLab 983
 
  • N.A. Huque, E. Daly, T. Wijeratne
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
 
  The cryogenic facilities for cryomodule testing at Jefferson Lab (JLab) have been modified and to enable testing of Linear Coherent Light Source-II (LCLS-II) cryomodules. Temporary changes in u-tube connections at the Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) has enabled rates of cavity cooling that are a factor of 10 higher than previously achieved. Cryogenic connections at JLab’s Low Energy Recirculator Facility (LERF) have been repurposed to enable two LCLS-II cryomodules to be tested in series. This testing shares the helium space with the Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) that is also used by the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Cryomodule testing can occur while beam operation is ongoing at CEBAF. Improvements to these facilities have allowed the testing of the JLab’s highest ever performing cryomodules.  
poster icon Poster THP051 [0.722 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP051  
About • paper received ※ 20 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 29 June 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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THP056 Current Results From Acceptance Testing of LCLS-II Cryomodules at Jefferson Lab 1007
 
  • M.A. Drury, E. Daly, N.A. Huque, L.K. King, A.D. Solopova
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
  • J. Nelson, B.H. Ripman, L.M. Zacarias
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  Funding: This work was supported by the LCLS-II Project and the U.S. Department of Energy, Contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.
The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is currently engaged, along with several other Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, in the Linac Co-herent Light Source II project (LCLS-II). The SRF Insti-tute at Jefferson Lab is currently building 21 cryomod-ules for this project. The cryomodules are based on the XFEL design and have been modified for continuous wave (CW) operation and to comply with other LCLS-II specifications. Each cryomodule contains eight 9-cell cavities with coaxial power couplers operating at 1.3 GHz. The cryomodule also contain a magnet package that consists of a quadrupole and two correctors. Most of these cryomodules will be tested in the Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) at Jefferson Lab before shipment to SLAC. Up to three of these cryomodules will be tested in a test stand set up in the Low Energy Recovery Facility (LERF) at Jefferson Lab. Acceptance testing of the LCLS-II cryomodules began in December 2016. Twelve cryomodules have currently completed Acceptance Test-ing. This paper will summarize the results of those tests.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2019-THP056  
About • paper received ※ 22 June 2019       paper accepted ※ 30 June 2019       issue date ※ 14 August 2019  
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